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Testing Toolbox

You always test every aspect of your application--- right ?

Every application needs to get tested – either it gets done before the product is released, which is ideal or your users will do it for you, which usually turns out to be a big mistake. Even if you don't formally recognize testing in your project development cycle, you are still, in fact, testing from day one. Here are some tools and techniques that can help ease the pain of testing your Visual FoxPro application and adding it into your development process. Along the way, I'll try to answer some immediate objections to formalized testing.

Testing Visual FoxPro Applications

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